Boulder landlord sues outdoor brand Fjallraven over $127K in unpaid rent

fjallraven

Fjallraven’s new Denver location opened in February. (Lily O’Neill)

Swedish outdoor brand Fjallraven is the latest prominent retailer to have a local post-pandemic lease dispute spill into court.

The owner of the company’s 3,830-square-foot store at 1048 Pearl St., Suite 115, in downtown Boulder sued Fjallraven last week, alleging the company failed to pay rent and other expenses for April through August.

The landlord, Ten Eleven Pearl LLC, declined to comment. It asks the court to award it damages and repossession of the property.

Fjallraven did not respond to a request for comment. The Boulder shop reopened in May and is currently open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week, according to a store employee.

The landlord says Fjallraven signed a seven-year lease agreement in 2016. Monthly base rent is $17,752.05, plus more than $7,500 in additional monthly charges, according to the lawsuit.

Fjallraven owes $88,760 in base rent and $38,261 in additional charges, for a total of about $127,000, the landlord claims. The shop’s landlord applied Fjallraven’s $23,072 security deposit to the unpaid rent, but the outdoor brand has failed to redeposit the amount and more after multiple notices, the landlord said.

Fjallraven bag

A Fjallraven bag. (Courtesy Fjallraven)

“Due to the developments around COVID-19, Ten Eleven waived certain late fees and interest for late payment under the lease but reserved all of its rights and remedies under the lease,” the lawsuit reads. “Ten Eleven did not waive any of Fjallraven’s other obligations under the lease, and the lease remains in full force and effect.”

Fjallraven, founded in 1960, has more than 30 brick-and-mortar stores across the country with its U.S. headquarters in Louisville. It’s known for its durable backpacks, outdoor apparel and other gear.

The brand also has stores in Denver, Castle Rock and Vail. The Denver location, in the new Platte Fifteen building in LoHi, opened in February.

Correction: A previous headline on this story incorrectly stated the amount owed.

fjallraven

Fjallraven’s new Denver location opened in February. (Lily O’Neill)

The lawsuit claims the Swedish company, which signed a seven-year lease in 2016 and still operates the shop seven days a week, owes $88,760 in rent and $38,261 for other expenses.

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One Comment

Patricia Mendez

Fjallraven items are not only great quality but they have incredible designs. However, brand management is generally mess.
Just a quick googling will show all the complains specially about their online shopping experience. They fail to refund people either for returns or even for items that costumers never received. Their customer service sucks: it’s impossible to get hold of them by phone and they reply after several days via email, if they do.

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